Photo
#Bird mural, Binghamton.

#Bird mural, Binghamton.

Tags: bird
Photo
Photo
'The Duke' is green chili cream cheese & ham on a bagel covered in more cheese. 
I bought three.

'The Duke' is green chili cream cheese & ham on a bagel covered in more cheese.
I bought three.

Photo
Cactapodes

Cactapodes

Photo
Shake. Shack. Dinner.

Shake. Shack. Dinner.

Photo
#Birds at #PeoplesClimate March.

#Birds at #PeoplesClimate March.

Photo
Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon, died Sept 1, 1914.
http://vertebrates.si.edu/birds/Martha/index.html

Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon, died Sept 1, 1914.

Photo
Walton Ford, ”Falling Bough,” 2002.Watercolor, gouache, ink and pencil on paper, 60 3/4 x 119 1/2 inches 
"The passenger pigeons were the most numerous birds that ever lived in the history of the planet. It’s almost disturbing how numerous- billions upon billions of birds. It was a fecundity that was almost disgusting. I started thinking about a blame-the-victim kind of attitude you could take to that…to make it seem like they had it coming, that there was this disgusting empire of birds and that it was corrupt like Rome…that it was bound to fall. So I invest the passenger pigeons with every kind of sin that I can imagine. And the bough, this gigantic branch, is falling under their tremendous weight. Meanwhile they go about their bickering and their lusts and foibles and all the disgusting things that they are doing." 
- Walton Ford

Walton Ford, ”Falling Bough,” 2002.Watercolor, gouache, ink and pencil on paper, 60 3/4 x 119 1/2 inches 

"The passenger pigeons were the most numerous birds that ever lived in the history of the planet. It’s almost disturbing how numerous- billions upon billions of birds. It was a fecundity that was almost disgusting. I started thinking about a blame-the-victim kind of attitude you could take to that…to make it seem like they had it coming, that there was this disgusting empire of birds and that it was corrupt like Rome…that it was bound to fall. So I invest the passenger pigeons with every kind of sin that I can imagine. And the bough, this gigantic branch, is falling under their tremendous weight. Meanwhile they go about their bickering and their lusts and foibles and all the disgusting things that they are doing." 

- Walton Ford

Photo
rhamphotheca:

Artist Walton Ford on His Wildlife Paintings
The 54-year-old artist has become famous for monumental wildlife pieces that bring a primal kingdom indoors. As he embarks on the next chapter of his life, his latest works reveal a new thoughtfulness…
by Claire Howorth
Up one wall of Walton Ford’s messy Manhattan studio stretches nine or so feet of a fantastical snake, his thick tail coiling along the banks of an Anatolian river, his jaw unhinged as a flock of delicate Turkish birds flutter down his gullet. Rhyndacus, the title of the nearly 10-by-5-foot painting, is inspired by an ancient Roman account of real and fabled creatures, On the Nature of Animals, and is one of several new works that Ford will present at a solo show at Paul Kasmin Gallery this month. The massive painting is remarkable not only for its scale and spectacle, but for what it reveals about Ford’s life these past couple of years…
(read more: Wall Street Journal)
Photography by Leonora Hamill for WSJ. Magazine

rhamphotheca:

Artist Walton Ford on His Wildlife Paintings

The 54-year-old artist has become famous for monumental wildlife pieces that bring a primal kingdom indoors. As he embarks on the next chapter of his life, his latest works reveal a new thoughtfulness…

by Claire Howorth

Up one wall of Walton Ford’s messy Manhattan studio stretches nine or so feet of a fantastical snake, his thick tail coiling along the banks of an Anatolian river, his jaw unhinged as a flock of delicate Turkish birds flutter down his gullet. Rhyndacus, the title of the nearly 10-by-5-foot painting, is inspired by an ancient Roman account of real and fabled creatures, On the Nature of Animals, and is one of several new works that Ford will present at a solo show at Paul Kasmin Gallery this month. The massive painting is remarkable not only for its scale and spectacle, but for what it reveals about Ford’s life these past couple of years…

(read more: Wall Street Journal)

Photography by Leonora Hamill for WSJ. Magazine

Photo
becausebirds:

brown-headed cowbirbs do not taste like chocolate

becausebirds:

brown-headed cowbirbs do not taste like chocolate