Photo
headlikeanorange:

Fledgling house sparrow

headlikeanorange:

Fledgling house sparrow

(via zanshinart)

Quote
"The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it."

— Henry David Thoreau (via observando)

(via thenightborn)

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Brooklyn Public Library #birds

Brooklyn Public Library #birds

Tags: birds
Photoset

ama-ar-gi:

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that.

 Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.

There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.

Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.

Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls. 

Sources: Mind of the Raven, Bernd Heinrich, The American Crow and the Common Raven, Lawrence Kilham 

(via dendroica)

Photo
thegetty:

Peaceful doves contrast a snarling wolf in this ink drawing from the early 1600s.
A Wolf and Two Doves, about 1610-1620, Sinibaldo Scorza. J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

Peaceful doves contrast a snarling wolf in this ink drawing from the early 1600s.

A Wolf and Two Doves, about 1610-1620, Sinibaldo Scorza. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via scientificillustration)

Text

The Rose-crested Cockatoo by William Nicholson,1917, Oil on canvas, 49 x 58 cm

The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology

One of Nicholson’s more idiosyncratic still lifes, showing a cockatoo tethered with a string round its leg, perched on a loaf of bread and pecking at it. The other elements of the composition are equally exotic: a black Japan tray and an overturned cup with tea leaves and a spoon.

Tags: birds
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(Source: mamonto, via eyepool)

Photoset

rispostesenzadomanda:

Seasonal greetings from your cat

#swipey

(Source: corporation-cats)

Tags: swipey
Photo
workman:

magictransistor:
Birds at Baran (16th century)

workman:

magictransistor:

Birds at Baran (16th century)

(Source: nihtegale, via dendroica)

Tags: birds
Photo
amnhnyc:


The perfect gift for bird-lovers, Natural Histories: Extraordinary Birds examines some of the pioneering naturalists, illustrators, and explorers who not only defined the discipline of ornithology, but also left a stunning body of art. 
Also included: forty ready-to-frame prints of reproduced artwork from the Museum’s Rare Book Collection.

amnhnyc:

The perfect gift for bird-lovers, Natural Histories: Extraordinary Birds examines some of the pioneering naturalists, illustrators, and explorers who not only defined the discipline of ornithology, but also left a stunning body of art.

Also included: forty ready-to-frame prints of reproduced artwork from the Museum’s Rare Book Collection.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

Tags: birds